See below for a list of our products.
    • Pork Butt

      The butt is the part of the shoulder that is located closest to the neck, separated from the picnic immediately atop the humoral/scapular articulation. Our boneless pork butts are packed fresh, skin off, trimmed to ¼-inch fat cover. We offer them boneless or bone in with the blade bone intact. While there are many uses for this cut, butts remain a favorite for barbecue. When smoked and pulled, the exceptional fat in these butts elevate the flavor and texture of barbecue to a pitmaster’s dream.

      A few of our favorite chefs have been known to put a beautifully marbled slice of butt on the grill to surprisingly great results, too.

      Our pork collar, or CT butt, is the intensely marbled muscle from the top of the shoulder between the neck and the loin. This is the cut that the Italians use for coppa, and that competition pit-masters refer to as “the money muscle.” This versatile and succulent cut is excellent smoked, roasted, braised or cut into chops and grilled.

    • Pork Shoulder

      Pork shoulder is the primal made up of the front leg, and contains both the butt and the picnic cuts. We offer it skin-on and bone-in, with the foot on or off. It is separated from the loin between the first and second rib, and there’s a three-inch shank on the foot-off version. A two-inch collar remains on the butt end, and fat is beveled to 1/4inch.

      Shoulders are preferred by many of our pitmaster friends for smoking. They like the subtle differences in texture and fat content of the butt and picnic ends, and demand a little of that cracklin’ skin in their barbecue. We love that about them.

    • Baby Back Ribs

      Baby back ribs are from high on the hog, cut from the loin off the back (where the rib meats the spine). With plenty of meat left on the bones, these are perfect for that juicy, “fall off the bone” meal. They are called “baby” only because they’re shorter than the St. Louis ribs cut from the spareribs off the side of the hog. Baby back ribs are preferred by many enthusiasts for being leaner than St. Louis ribs.

    • 10 Rib Rack

      By far one of our most popular cuts, the 10-rib rack is often referred to as a “center-cut rack.” It’s fabricated from the loin, with the sirloin end and a bit of the rib end removed leaving 10 rib bones. The chine and feather bones are removed, leaving the rack completely knife ready for portioning. This beautifully marbled cut is great roasted whole to be the star of your dinner party, but also very easily turned into thick chops by simply cutting between the bones.

    • Whole Loin

      Pigs are basically made up of four parts–one of each on both sides: loins, bellies, shoulders and hams. The loin is the “High on the Hog” part from which some of the very best parts are derived…chops, baby back ribs and tenderloins. Our whole, bone-in pork loins are perfect for butcher shops or chefs who like to do their own fabrication, and represent an excellent value for users who have a band saw. These loins are available in several formats and pack arrangements, including skin on or skinless, bladeless, or center cut.

    • Pork Tenderloin

      The Filet Mignon of pork, Pork Tenderloin is the leanest and most tender of our cuts, but don’t be dismayed. These dainty one-pound tenders still benefit from the marbling that you can count on from Cheshire Pork It’s there in the remarkably rich flavor, succulent texture, and fork-tenderness.

    • Porterhouse Roast

      Cut from whole loins, our Porterhouse short loin roast is the part of the loin below the 10-rib rack. Approximately 6.5 inches in length, it includes the portion of the loin with tenderloin on one side of the T-bone. Our photo is of a porterhouse chop cut from this roast; we think they are the most beautiful chops on the hog. The chime bone is off, but the roast will require a band saw for fabrication into chops. 

    • Ham

      These are whole, bone-in, fresh, raw hams (not treated with cure or smoke). They are the skin-on, rear leg of the animal, separated from the loin by a cut perpendicular to the aitch bone. We offer the whole hams both with and without the foot attached. A two-inch collar is cut around the face of the ham and skinned, and the foot-off version has a two-inch shank. Slow-roasted, the ham is both delicious and stunning on your carving board. For making your own deli ham, boneless versions are available as well.

    • Pork Cheeks

      Pork cheeks are the most interesting morsels on the pig, and some say the tastiest. Ours are skinned, peeled, and ready to cook. The meat is a deep red, and the cheeks are shot through with streaks of collagen that melt when cooked. Brown them and braise them in cider, chicken stock or dark beer–the results will be fork tender and mouthwatering.

    • Pork Shoulder Picnic

      The picnic is the leg portion of the pork shoulder, and many pitmasters prefer this cut over butts for barbecue. It’s also often cured and smoked for picnic ham. Ours comes skin on, bone in, with the hock removed, leaving about two inches of shank on the picnic. The isolated cushion part of the picnic, the triceps muscle complex, is available also.

    • Hock

      This cut comes from the leg just above the pig’s foot, so there’s minimal fat. Cooked low and slow, the collagen will break down, delivering tender, sweet meat and a tasty broth. Of course, Southern Grandmothers will tell you the best the thing to do with a hock is to add it to a pot of slow simmering beans.

    • Pork Brisket

      The brisket is the curved, meaty lower portion of the spare rib that contains the soft cartilage bones, or “rib tips.” Some folks like to smoke the whole spare rib. Some buy it to cut the St. Louis rack off for serving guests, and keep the brisket and rib tips for themselves.

    • Spare Rib

      While the baby back rib comes from high on the hog, the spare rib is the part of the rib cage below that, nestled into the belly. It’s made up of the hard bones that comprise the St. Louis ribs, and the brisket. The brisket is the curved, meaty lower portion of the spare rib that contains the soft cartilage bones, or “rib tips.” Some folks like to smoke the whole spare rib. Some buy it to cut the St. Louis rack off for serving guests, and keep the brisket and rib tips for themselves.

    • St. Louis Ribs

      St. Louis ribs are cut from the spare rib, the section below the baby backs. These racks are what remain after the curved brisket part of the sparerib is removed (with a straight cut between the hard bones and the soft cartilage bones below).

      It’s the most frequent choice of competition pit-masters for a reason: they like the fact that the bones are not as curved as the baby backs, so the racks are flatter and more uniform in shape. Many would tell you that the St. Louis ribs are much more tender than baby backs due to their higher fat content.

    • Pork Belly

      Our most popular cut, Cheshire Pork bellies are a favorite among chefs. They appreciate both the large amount of lean in the bellies and the quality of the fat. High in oleic acid, the fat has a firm texture and a silky ‘mouth feel’ that sets our bellies apart from others. These bellies are nicely squared off at the ends, and are available with the rind, or skin, on or off. We also offer the belly bone-in with the sparerib still attached, or in as a single rib belly, with all the bones removed leaving all the rib meat still attached.

    • Shank

      Part of the rear leg below the ham and above the foot, pork shank is the perfect cut for braising. We like to cook it until the meat falls off the bone, and then serve it over polenta or pasta. Available skin on or off, and weighing in at two pounds plus, they are an impressive site on the plate when served whole. We also offer them in Osso Buco slices–either two or four inches thick–that make the portion size a bit easier to handle.

Click on a cut photo to see details

Distributors

Purely Gourmet Meat Co.

4345 W Division St

Chicago, IL 60651

773-731-3180

www.purelymeat.com

US Foods Milwaukee

W137 N9245 Hwy 145
Menomonee Falls WI 53051

800-285-2442

usfoods.com

US Foods Metro

1051 Amboy Avenue
Perth Amboy NJ 08861

732-934-3400

usfoods.com

US Foods Chicago

800 Supreme Dr, Suite 200
Bensenville IL 60106

630-595-1200

usfoods.com

US Foods Streator

1 Quality Ln
Streator IL 61364

815-673-6400

usfoods.com

US Foods Fort Mill

800 Food Service Dr
Fort Mill SC 29715

803-802-6000

usfoods.com

US Foods Raleigh

1500 NC-39
Zebulon NC 27597

919-404-4100

usfoods.com

Fells Point Meats

2730 Wilmarco Ave
Baltimore MD 21223

410-539-5600

fpwmeats.com

Driscoll Foods

174 Delawanna Ave
Clifton NJ 07014

973-672-9400

driscollfoods.com

Metropolitan Meat, Seafood & Poultry

1920 Stanford Ct
Landover MD 20785

301-772-0060

metropoultry.com

Cheney Brothers Ocala

2801 W Silver Springs Blvd
Ocala FL 34475

800-939-4018

cheneybrothers.com

Cheney Brothers Statesville

195 Business Park Dr.
Statesville NC 28677

800-899-3921

cheneybrothers.com

Cheney Brothers Goldsboro

402 Commerce Ct
Goldsboro NC 27534

800-899-3921

cheneybrothers.com

Sysco Hampton Roads

7000 Harbour View Boulevard
Suffolk VA 23435

757-673-4000

sysco.com

Sysco Virginia

5081 S Valley Pike
Harrisonburg VA 22801

540-434-0761

sysco.com

Sysco Metro

20 Theodore Conrad Dr
Jersey City NJ 07305

201-433-2000

metrony.sysco.com

Sysco Columbia

131 Sysco Ct
Columbia SC 29209

803-239-4000

syscosc.com

Sysco Raleigh

1032 Baugh Road
Selma NC 27576

919-755-2455

syscoraleigh.com

Buckhead Dallas

4216 Mint Way
Dallas TX 75237

214-331-8711

buckheadbeef.com

Ben E Keith Foods Oklahoma

14200 North Santa Fe Avenue
Edmond OK 73013

405-753-7600

benekeith.com

Buckhead Meat Northeast

220 Raritan Center Pkwy
Edison NJ 08837

732-661-4900

buckheadbeefne.com

Buckhead Meat of Florida

355 Progress Road
Auburndale FL 33823

863-508-1050

buckheadbeefflorida.com

Buckhead Beef Atlanta

4500 Wickersham Drive
College Park GA 30337

404-355-4400

buckheadbeef.com